Pheasants – Exotic and Rare Bird Inventory

Lady Amherst’s Pheasants

Lady Amherst Pheasant

“Lady Amherst Pheasant RWD3” by Dick Daniels

The Lady Amherst’s pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) is a bird of the order Galliformes and the family Phasianidae. These are native to south western China and Burma, but have been introduced elsewhere, and have established a self-supporting, but now declining, feral population in England, the stronghold of which is now in Bedfordshire. The adult male is 100–120 cm in length, its tail accounting for 80 cm of the total length. It is unmistakable with its black and silver head, long grey tail and rump, and red, blue, white and yellow body plumage. The “cape” can be raised in display. This species is closely related to the golden pheasant and the introduced populations in England will interbreed. The female is much less showy, with a duller mottled brown plumage all over, similar to that of the female common pheasant but with finer barring. She is very like the female golden pheasant, but has a darker head and cleaner underparts than the hen of that species. Despite the male’s showy appearance, these birds are very difficult to see in their natural habitat, which is dense, dark forests with thick undergrowth. Consequently, little is known of their behaviour in the wild.

Red, Yellow, Golden Pheasants

Golden Pheasant

“Chrysolophus pictus walking” by Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

Yellow-Golden-Pheasant_male

Yellow

The golden pheasant or Chinese pheasant, (Chrysolophus pictus) is a gamebird of the order Galliformes (gallinaceous birds) and the family Phasianidae (pheasants). It is native to forests in mountainous areas of western China, but feral populations have been established in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. In England they may be found in East Anglia in the dense forest landscape of the Breckland. The adult male is 90–105 cm in length, its tail accounting for two-thirds of the total length. It is unmistakable with its goldencrest and rump and bright red body. The deep orange “cape” can be spread in display, appearing as an alternating black and orange fan that covers all of the face except its bright yellow eye with a pinpoint black pupil. There are also different mutations of the golden pheasant known from birds in captivity, including the dark-throated, yellow, cinnamon, salmon, peach, splash, mahogany and silver. In aviculture, the wild type is referred to as “red golden” to differentiate it from these mutations.

 gray peacock pheasants
 manderan pheasants